Driving Tips

ROAD SIGNS

Drivers should understand the meaning of traffic signs before they attempt to drive on public roads. Traffic signs and roadway markings are divided into a number of broad categories

  1. Regulatory
  2. Warning
  3. Information

Different types of signs are used on motorways and a special series of warning signs are used for road works. Most Road signs in the Republic are in both Gaelic and English. Ireland is striving towards metrication so the all new-style green and white signs are in kilometers. However, nothing is quite that simple in Ireland so expect to come across some black-on-white signs showing distances in miles. As in Britain, road signs in the North are always in miles. One road sign that is unique to the Republic is the "Yield" sign - in the UK this is worded "Give Way". Throughout both the Republic and Northern Ireland, brown signs with white lettering indicate places of historical, cultural or leisure interest.

ROADWAY MARKETING

  1. Single or double continuous white lines along the center of the road; all traffic must keep to the left of the line (except in an emergency or for access).
  2. Broken white lines along the centre of the road alert drivers and must not be crossed unless it is safe to do so.
  3. Double broken white lines along the centre of the road alert drivers to continuous white lines a short distance ahead and must not be crossed unless it is safe to do so.
  4. Broken white lines together with single white lines - the line nearest the driver must be obeyed.
  5. A single broken yellow line along the edge of the roadway - indicates the edge of a carriageway where a hard shoulder is normally provided.

TRAFFIC LIGHTS

  1. RED LIGHT A driver approaching a traffic light showing red must not proceed beyond the stop line at that light or, if there is no stop line, beyond that light.
  2. AMBER LIGHT A driver approaching a traffic light showing amber while no other traffic light (immediately above or below) shows any light, must not proceed beyond the stop line at that light or, if there is no stop line, beyond that light) save when the vehicle is so close to the stop line when the amber light is first engaged that the vehicle cannot safely be halted before the stop line.
  3. GREEN LIGHT A driver approaching a traffic light showing green may proceed past the light provided the way is clear.
  4. GREEN ARROW A driver approaching a traffic light showing a lighted green arrow may proceed in the direction indicated by the arrow (provided the way is clear and it is safe to do so) not withstanding that another light facing the driver is showing red.

SPEED LIMITS

In the Republic and Northern Ireland the maximum speed limit, which is shown in miles, are more or less the same as those in Britain.

  • 30mph (50km/h) in built up areas
  • 60mph (95km/h) outside built up areas
  • 70mph (110km/h) on motorways

On certain roads, which are clearly marked the speed limits are either 40mph (65km/h) or 50mph (80km/h). Where there is no indication the speed limit is 60mph (95km/h). In the Republic, vehicles towing caravans must not exceed 55mph (90km/h) on any road. Speed limits are more strictly enforced in the North than in the Republic.

PARKING RESTRICTIONS

  1. Parking Prohibited at all times.
  2. Parking Prohibited during times shown on information plate.
  3. Clearway; stopping or parking prohibited by any vehicle (other than buses or taxis) at the times shown on the information plate. During "Clearway Hours" a vehicle may not park at a meter or disk parking place provided in the clearway.
  4. Parking prohibited during business hours. It is permissible to stop for the purposes of picking up or setting down passengers or to load/unload goods when these prohibitions are in force.
  5. No Parking at any time. It is permissible to stop for the purposes of picking up or setting down passengers or to load/unload goods when these prohibitions are in force. Business hours may vary from town to town but in most major towns "business hours" means Monday to Friday 8.00 a.m. to 6.30 p.m.

ACCIDENTS

Any driver involved in an accident must STOP his/her vehicle and remain at the scene of the accident for a reasonable time. However, if the vehicle or vehicles are obstructing the road or pose a danger to other road users, the position of the vehicles should be marked and the vehicles moved off the actual carriageway as quickly as possible.

  • A driver involved in an accident must, if requested by a Garda (Police), give his/her name and address, the address at which the vehicle is being kept, the name and address of the vehicle owner, the vehicle registration number and evidence of insurance.
  • If no Garda is present, this information must be given to anyone involved in the accident, or upon request, to an independent witness.
  • Where a person or persons are injured and no Garda is present at the scene, the accident MUST be reported to the nearest convenient Garda Station.
  • Where property damage only is involved, it is not necessary to report the accident to the Gardai but the relevant information referred to above must be given to the person whose property has been damaged.
  • Accidents involving uninsured or visiting motorists should be reported to the Motor Insurers Bureau of Ireland, 3/4 South Frederick Street, Dublin 2.

Always drive on the left and give way to traffic from the right.

Head Office
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Knocklong County Limerick,
Ireland
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